There’s more to Las Vegas than casinos, night clubs and the neon lights of the Las Vegas strip. If you prefer the wide open roads of the Nevada desert, you’ll want to know how to rent a Harley in Las Vegas.
 

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Harley-Davidson Road King. Photo © 2015 Nancy D. Brown

 
Las Vegas Harley-Davidson

The first thing you’ll need to do to begin your journey is to fly into McCarran International Airport and get yourself to the Las Vegas Harley-Davidson dealer on Las Vegas Blvd. This is assuming you have a motorcycle endorsement on your driver’s license*. If you prefer riding with your own gear, bring it, otherwise helmets and riding gear are available for rent at an additional charge. For peace of mind, you’ll want to purchase motorcycle full coverage insurance, even if you have your own insurance. The entire process of renting a motorcycle takes about half and hour from arrival to check out.
 

 

 

When you make your reservations online in advance, you’ll have an option to select the motorcycle model. My husband rented a 2015 Harley-Davidson Road King. The bike is comfortable and gives a great classic Harley-Davidson sound and ride. It’s good for a solo rider or two up.
 

Nancy Brown, Harley-Davidson, motorcycle

Cory and Nancy Brown on Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

 

The Ride
With easy access to Boulder City, you have three choices, head to Hoover Dam or north to Lake Shore Road or simply enjoy fine riding through the Nevada desert. With a powerful, reliable engine between his legs, my husband’s only concern was to be aware of his surroundings and the park police. According to my husband, “all you’ll see is fine scenery, open road and other motorcycles passing through the Valley of Fire.”
 

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These roads were meant for motorcycles. Photo © 2015 Nancy D. Brown

 

After riding about 100 miles he stopped at Sugar’s Home Plate in Overton, Nevada for lunch. The rental manager Eric Ruffin had recommended this classic American diner for the food, as well as the people. The food was good and portions were as big as a Harley’s engine.
 

The Bike
With lunch behind him, he was ready to log some more miles in the desert. Next decision to be made; go back through the Valley of Fire or take the freeway back to the Las Vegas strip. Time was a factor for my husband, as we had early dinner reservations at Yusho Las Vegas, a Japanese Grill and Noodle Bar, and were anxious to see the Michael Jackson One show at the Mandalay Bay hotel.
 

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But enough about our night life plans, more about the bike. With its ample torque, the Road King cruised the smooth, two-lane road like only a Harley can. The ABS (anti-lock breaking system) stopped the bike with authority. The small, but readable, digital display gives you the gear you’re in, rpm (revolutions per minute), trip meter and odometer, but does not diminish the bike visually.

Overall, he determined that this was a good use of a day on the road, away from the strip. “Motorcycles are good,” said Cory Brown.
 

Nancy Brown, harley-davidson, motorcycle, horse

Horses and Harley’s

 

As a side note, 15 years ago my husband surprised me while I was horseback riding with a friend in the hills of Contra Costa County in Northern California. He had rented a Harley-Davidson Road King for the day and wanted to see how I would take the news while he implied that he had purchased the motorcycle. As any equestrian knows, load noises and horses do not make the perfect pairing, yet we both remain committed to different types of horse power.
 

las vegas, nevada, harley-davidson

Las Vegas, Nevada

 

If You Go:
Las Vegas Harley-Davidson (702) 431-8500
5191 S. Las Vegas Blvd.
Las Vegas, Nevada 89119

*The Las Vegas dealership offers a Riding Academy for new riders and those looking for a skilled rider course. Article written by, photos and video courtesy of Travel Writer Nancy D. Brown of What a Trip, Travels from Northern California. Las Vegas Harley-Davidson supplied my husband with a Road King motorcycle to facilitate research for this article. All opinions are his own.